Using the orchestral voices in a Rodgers organ
As the first organ builder to integrate MIDI in a classical organ in the 1980s, Rodgers led the way for organists to exploit a truly orchestral style of playing.

The first sound modules available provided a basic set of orchestral/instrumental voices of moderately good sound quality given the memory and polyphony constraints of the technology at that time.

Over time, sound modules expanded and improved in sound quality with the current Roland Integra 7 representing a pinnacle with over 6,000 top-quality voices.

Rodgers eliminated the need for an external sound module in 2009 with the introduction of the SSC technology platform (2009 - 2021).  The SSC organs (500/Classic series, Artist, Infinity, and Roland Classic models) feature built-in orchestral voices that are easier to access and offer more advanced control features than previous orchestral voices accessed via MIDI.

With the debut of the current DS Core technology platform in 2018, Rodgers again advanced the state of orchestral voices with new high-resolution samples and new capabilities, such as the Enhanced Orchestral Coupler that enables playing two voices in one division with each voice dedicated to a melodic/harmonic part (think of it as soprano and alto or tenor and bass).  See the Water Music video below for an example of this capability that creates a rather realistic orchestral ensemble.

The current Rodgers models still have a fully integrated MIDI interface for when this capability is needed, but the orchestral voices continue to be directly accessible (just like the Voice Palette organ voices) without having to deal with the mechanics of the MIDI protocol.

Enjoy this demonstration video by Dan Miller on using orchestral voices.

Learn more about the Enhanced Orchestral Coupler feature with a recording and the printed music with instructions by Dan Miller. 
The videos below demonstrate a variety of ways to use orchestral voices, both by themselves and in ensemble with traditional organ stops.
Rodgers Inspire (18 voices)
Piano
Electric Piano
Harp
Harpsichord
Celesta
Strings
Slow Strings
Choir Oohs
Choir Aahs
Gospel Organ I
Gospel Organ II
Flute
Trumpet
Oboe
Clarinet
Handbells
Timpani
Chimes


Rodgers Imagine (37 voices)
Grand Piano
Electric Piano
Harpsichord 8'
Harpsichord 4'
Harpsichord Lute
Harpsichord 8' + 4"
Celesta
Xylophone
Orchestral Harp
Drawbars 1
Drawbars 2
Guitar
Acoustic Bass
String Ensemble
Orchestra
Slow Strings
Octave Strings
Violin
Saxophone
Orchestral Trumpet
Trombone
Bright Brass
Brass Ensemble
French Horn
Tuba
Orchestral Flute
Bagpipes
Panpipes
Orchestral Oboe
Orchestral Clarinet
Bandoneon
Choir Oohs
Choir Aahs
Organ Chimes
Tubular Bells
Handbells
Timpani

Rodgers Infinity (61 voices)
Grand Piano
Grand Piano 2
Electric Piano
Fantasia
Harpsichord 8'
Harpsichord 4'
Harpsichord Lute
Harpsichord 8' + 4"
Celesta
Xylophone
Orchestral Harp
Drawbars 1
Drawbars 2
Guitar
Acoustic Bass
String Ensemble
Smooth Strings
Orchestra
Slow Strings
Pizzicato
Contra Basses
Octave Strings
Slow Violin/Cello
Chamber Strings
Violin
Saxophone
Tenor Saxophone
Piccolo Trumpet
Orchestral Trumpet
Mellow Horn
Trombone
Bright Brass
Brass Ensemble
Muted Trumpet
French Horn Section
French Horn
Tuba
Orchestral Flute
Bagpipes
Panpipes
Recorder
Orchestral Piccolo
Orchestral English Horn
Orchestral Bassoon
Orchestral Oboe
Orchestral Clarinet
Bandoneon
Choir Oohs
Choir Aahs
Organ Chimes
Tubular Bells
Tower Chimes
Handbells
Timpani
Timpani Roll
Ride Cymbal
Crash Cymbal
Orchestral Snare
Snare Roll
Percussion Set

Faure's beautiful Sicilienne performed on an Infinity 484 in the unusual architecture of the Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand.
Ralph Vaughan William's arrangement of Old 100th realized with a combination of organ and orchestral voices on an Imagine 351.
Aaron Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man played with pipes, digital organ stops and orchestral voices on an Infinity 361.
An impressionistic arrangement of Stephen Adams' The Holy City played on the new Infinity 367 that combines the full resources of the organ stops with orchestral voices.
The guitar voice is featured by itself in this performance of Asturias by Albenez on an Inspire 233.
This performance of Caccini's Ave Maria seamlessly blends organ and orchestral voices on an Infinity 484.
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